2020 Bold Vision Tenth Year Anniversary

Bold Vision’s Tenth Year Story Request

Bold Vision is ten years old and our website is renewing itself with more stories and images

We want your stories pictures and videos of our early days developing the Hill Station the Community Garden or New Cross Learning of Friendly Fridays Green – 14 Big Green Day Grow Wild, Art and Performance and more

Any stories you would like to see on Bold Vision’s website please send to Valentina or David: Vroma001@gold.ac.uk /david.holloway@theideascollege.org

Feed The Hill

Feed The Hill is a community response to the Covid-19 emergency. Over three weeks in March 436 people volunteered, 5,500 houses across New Cross Gate and Telegraph Hill were leafleted and £14,000 was raised to distribute food to those made vulnerable by the pandemic. As the emergency accelerates and more people loose income the project is scaling up, extending its reach and offering more support to those in need. £30 buys a box of food and other essentials for a family for a week. Click on the DONATE BUTTON above to access our Just Giving portal. Thank you.

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Watch this space for our Tenth Anniversary activities and events!

Anniversary fundraising drive: 50% towards our groups’ project activities, 30% to core costs (arts, admin and publicity) and 20% for a 10th Year Party – in June you are all invited! More info nearer the day. Just hit the ‘Make A Donation’ button

A glimpse at our Project

Transforming a dank cellar into The Hill Station 2010

Transformation

Library & Learning

Open 10-5 Tuesdays – Saturdays

Environment

Open after hibernation in March see Projects pages for more details

Refugees

Mothers & Babies

Art & Music

Stories from the refugee camp

Here are our one minute a day videos from the October/November 2017 visit to the camp

The first day: gathering materials

Artmongering with Refugees – We are missing Azraq from Artmongers on Vimeo.

The second day: chocolate fountaineering and wool winding

ARTMONGERING WITH REFUGEES – BACK INTO ACTION from Artmongers on Vimeo.

The third day: out and about with chocolate, art, knitting and the trolley

ARTMONGERING WITH REFUGEES – SWEET MINGLING from Artmongers on Vimeo.

The fourth day: circles of hope – in conversation with the women and in the ‘pink zone’

ARTMONGERING WITH REFUGEES – HOPE CIRCLE from Artmongers on Vimeo.

The fifth day: getting in the pink to create a new artspace

ARTMONGERING WITH REFUGEES – C'MON YALLA from Artmongers on Vimeo.

The sixth day: accepting the trolley might not be the answer to reach isolated women in the camp and finding a new way

ARTMONGERING WITH REFUGEES – REACHING ISOLATED WOMEN from Artmongers on Vimeo.

Week Two: creating the giant water trolley

ARTMONGERING WITH REFUGEES – MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER from Artmongers on Vimeo.

 

Welcoming Spring 2020 Sundays in March 2-5

Drop-in find out what’s happening: planning for the new season, weeding, cutting back, volunteering or just for a chat and a chill in this mini oasis on Telegraph Hill.

Past workshops:

Free Workshop on Natural Dyes – Take 2

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Due to unforeseen circumstances we have rescheduled the Natural Dyes workshop so please join us on:

Saturday 1st August 11-1PM

For this free workshop on Natural dyes.

Our workshop leader is STILL foraging away in preparation for this hands-on workshop.

Get some practical tips and learn about the fascinating history of natural dyes in the beautiful setting of Common Growth Community Garden.

Limited places available!
Email commongrowthuk@gmail.com to confirm your places. Please give the names of attendees and a contact phone number.

Common Growth Community Garden is at Sandbourne Road, New Cross, SE4 2NS.

The workshops are informal and fun. Places will be allocated on a first come first served basis. All courses are free, but we suggest a £3 voluntary donation to help cover the costs of materials. This is one of a series of workshops by Cloister Garden and Common Growth funded by the Telegraph Hill Ward Assembly Fund.

Hope to see you soon!
https://www.facebook.com/Commongrowth

Twinning: growing girl power

Our original idea with the ChangeMakers was to have young adults 18-25 years old. What we quickly discovered though was that would mean girls and boys could not work together. So instead we decided to work with 13-16 year olds.  Some of the people we talked to were still sceptical about whether that could work but we decided to give it a go anyway.

Peace ROCKS 1a

In the first session I ran, we had about twice as many boys as girls. They were bigger, more physically noticeable and more demanding of attention. The girls would have been easily overlooked. So although letting each one of the 25 of them have their say and explain what JOY means to them, and let the interpreter explain it to me took a lot of time, it was an important shift. It meant the girls did speak. And they expressed themselves capably and beautifully which gave them more confidence. By the end of our 2 hour session they were sitting a little taller and more assuredly.

The next day as I arrived I started to see people I recognised from that session. And they recognised me. Already things felt a little different to the day before. I had asked the staff to gather 2 smaller groups, still with a 50/50 gender balance of young people, to get started on the baseline research. I explained the idea to them, they practiced on each other and then we set out to interview residents and gather data.

At first my young researchers were very hesitant. It is not easy to knock on doors in any context and this was no exception. The boys were more prepared to just get on with it but I could see how the girls really wanted to run away, how they were wishing they hadn’t signed up for this. I also know from my own experience that this awkwardness is part of the process that has to be gone through to get to the other side. I couldn’t speak directly to them because of the language barrier but could be there for them in the background and loved seeing them grow in stature and confidence as they progressed. By the time they came back the next day to do more they all looked a foot taller and three years older. They were proud of their new skill and I was proud of them.

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Interesting to how despite all the terrible reasons why they are there, these girls and other women in the camp may have experiences and develop skills and confidence there that they would never have been able to do in the villages. I’m no expert on the local culture, but that was the sense I got from the experience. Maybe in the long run some good also comes out of the situation in terms of the isolation of the women in their homes.

(for security reasons and for their safety, we can’t post pictures of them here, hence more generic shots)

You can contribute here and help train a researcher or get involved.