Refugee twinning – how you can help

We are looking for two kinds of help:

  1. Time and skills – we have various projects in development and need lots of different skills to make them happen. Seethe latest info on our project website Refugeetwinning.org
  2. Money – either a donation, or set up your fundraising campaign to make a contribution. See our Just Giving page here

Refugee Week: our project Impact Report Jun 20

It is Refugee Week this week – and Global Refugee Day today.

It’s a huge problem. 60 million displaced persons. Where to start? It can all feel too much to even keep them all alive, let alone find a future.
Twinning Event Poster Last

What we are doing with Artmongers and Bold Vision is small, but at least it works. Even if only a few dozen people have better well-being, it’s a start. It’s better than despairing or turning away.

You can be part of the next phase by coming along to our meeting at the Hill Station on Sat Jun 25, 7-9pm.

Or you can donate here.

Today we are publishing our Impact Report about the first phase of the project. Contact cmshovlin@gmail.com if you would like a copy.

Az evalIn it we explore the issues on the camp, explain our approach and share the encouraging results of our impact research using the 5 factors of well being.

 

#peacerocks come to London Mar 2016

Show solidarity with Syrian refugees by making a peace rock and displaying it on your doorstep. Or giving it to someone you wan tot make peace with so they can display it on theirs.

We made them at Common Growth, outside the Hill Station and outside New Cross Learning. It was a joy.

Peace Rocks! Oh Yes it does… from Artmongers on Vimeo.

Peace Rocks in SE London

workshop 2T
Photo by Artmongers

First Artmongers made them in the Syrian refugee camp and now we are making them here as part of the Bold Vision Refugee Twinning project. These are free events. 

Show your support for the refugees and make a little peace right here. Maybe you will give your Peace Rock to a friend you fell out with. Maybe a neighbour you haven’t said hello to yet. Or someone who is new to your street.

Artmongers are running workshops all over the place for the next week with the help of Bold Vision. Come along and share the joy. It only takes a few minutes. We want to see Peace Rocks strewn all over the Hill and New Cross.

Wear old clothes. Bring along a small rock from your garden or your bathroom shelf. Rocks also provided for the hard up.

Maybe you have a few old pots of half used paint (preferably gloss paint) that you know you will probably never use. Why not bring those along too and share your colours.

Workshops will take place at the following Bold Vision venues:

  • Common Growth Garden: Sun Feb 28, 1-3pm
  • Hill Station Cafe:  Tue Mar 1, 3-5pm
  • New Cross Learning: Thu Mar 3, 4-5pm
  • John Stainer School (tbc)

Let us know if you would like to run a workshop at your place of worship, club or neighbourhood.

Peace ROCKS 3
Photo by Artmongers

Refugee camp report back

As some of you already know, Bold Vision team member Catherine went back to the refugee camp in January to try to pilot some of our twinning projects. Here are some of the outcomes she could report on.

the road

IMPACT EVALUATION of first projects: This was the primary reason for the visit. If weAz eval can’t show what we did made any difference then it will be hard to raise funds for future projects. We were delighted to see the data confirmed our hypothesis based on all of the work Artmongers and Bold Vision have done – that empowering refugees to change their environment builds connections and increases well being. We looked at a village on the camp where Artmongers did not do any work (control group), and one where they did (affected group), and gathered wellbeing data both before and after the intervention.

impact

As you can see from the chart, the affected group showed a significantly better change in wellbeing over the last six months, especially the women. Staff on the camp confirmed there had been no other interventions that could account for this.

A couple more houses had been painted in the vicinity of Hope Square.Az paintedThey were keen to show me what they had done for themselves. And I saw Peace Rocks in the office. It is unfortunate that the increased security in place since activity increased in Syria greatly restricted the time I could spend in the camp, but I still had many heartening interactions with refugees, staff and volunteers.

Going back was an important step in developing our relationship with the camp. Some staff and some children were the same and remembered me from the July visit. They were surprised and reassured that we were back and much more confident when I said that we would be back again. They see a lot of visitors – there were 3 delegations while I was there this time – but they don’t often see people twice. They saw that we mean it. That we want to be with them.

SEWING CIRCLES: There are many traditions of women gathering to makeAz sequinsthings together. Creating bonds and community strength as they do. Quilting circles among American pioneers, arpillera groups in Peru – even our own knitting group in Telegraph Hill. We gathered materials from local residentsAz sewand friends, from a sympathetic shop owner in Brick Lane, from materials donated to new Cross Learning. Because of police restrictions in the camp it wasn’t possible to run the sessions in among the shelters, but the staff helped gather a group of women and girls to meet at the communityAz embroiderycentre where about 20 of us experimented with sequins and designs and embroidery thread. One or two of the girls knew some things and I loved seeing their pride as they showed their friends how to thread a needle. Others had no idea and required my (fairly rubbish!) sewing tuition. By the end, they all knew how to thread a needle with the right length of thread, tie a knot in the end, and do chain stitch. It’s a start. I hope they experiment some more with the left over scraps and start to imagine. Maybe if they take their sewing home their grandmothers will remember and show them more

BOOK DONATIONS: thanks to book donations from around the hill, andAz bookssome helpful rule bending by the British Airways check in desk, I managed to take about 40 children’s books to the camps. They were all English which isn’t ideal but I read some of them to groups of children – with enough sign language, the pictures and the odd bit of English vocabulary, we collaborated some understanding of the stories. They liked the idea of a mobile library and we evolved that into a mobile story telling unit. On our next visit we will organise that so that stories can go to the children, maybe with some activities and a few stools or cushions to create pop up story telling circles. When they build the library on the camp later this year this will work well together. Since my visit \I have also made contact with an Arabic book publisher and an organisation creating the first spoken book materials in Arabic to help those people with low literacy also access learning and entertainment.

SONG EXCHANGE: Before going to the camp, Catherine met with Byron, the music coordinator at Edmund Waller and he invited some of the children to perform some traditional English songs. While she was there, Catherine explained Incey Wincey spider (!!) and gave the children’s activities leader the words and actions. He will teach the children in the camp the song and send a film back to Edmund Waller. He will also film them singing a traditional Syrian song so children here can learn it. We hope one day they can sing together over live streaming. Note that in both locations this is being treated as a regular song exchange. The children don’t share information about their stories / circumstances and the videos will not be published anywhere.

NEXT STEPS

  • They agreed that they would like more squares like Hope Square to be made so we are looking for ways of funding the £15k it will cost to do 4 more.
  • We will make a shorter version of the video with a voiceover which they will then get agreement for so we can publish it online
  • I will write a report based on the impact evaluation with a view to getting more funding
  • With more staff connections on the camp, we will make sure the next visit is a step forward for these other projects and maybe the next ones
  • We will send them photos of Peace Rocks in the Telegraph Hill Festival

Az sunset